Humanities and Social Sciences

Meander

Content

Meander | Vol. 73 (2018) |

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Abstract

This article discusses passages in the works of Greek and Roman writers, from Homer to the Church Fathers and Procopius, in which the seaside is a place of carefree play, those in which looking at the sea seems to have a good influence on the human mind, those in which walking on the shore is an opportunity for a philosophical dispute, and those in which pleasure is derived from being alone near the sea.

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Authors and Affiliations

Jan M. Kozłowski
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Abstract

This article shows how the Iliad is an object of creative reception by Callimachus in his sixth hymn, the "Hymn to Demeter".

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Annette Harder
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Abstract

Rufinus, the author of erotic epigrams appearing in book 5 of the Palatine Anthology, remains a mysterious personage since scholars have divergent opinions on the period in which he lived. The article relates those discussions and analyses the contents and style of the poems, ten of which are translated here into Polish.

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Krzysztof Tomasz Witczak
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Abstract

The Typhonomachia, the episode from Nonnus’ Dionysiaca, in which the poet forcefully depicts the commotion in the universe resulting from the monster’s efforts to subdue Zeus and other gods, is here translated into Polish with a concise introduction and notes.

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Katarzyna Kryńska
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Abstract

The poems opening the second and third book of Martial’s epigrams are printed here in Joanna Stadler’s Polish translation, with notes and a short introduction.

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Joanna Stadler
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Abstract

Agata Łuka’s free Polish translation of a passage of Petronius.

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Agata Łuka
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Abstract

The article analyses Tacitus’ description of Petronius’ suicide (Ann. XVI 18–19).

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Joanna Kłos
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Abstract

This article traces the origin of legends concerning Julian the Apostate’s death and the fate of his body, appearing in such works as The Golden Legend and Boccaccio’s De casibus virorum illustrium.

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Beata Spieralska-Kasprzyk
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Abstract

This paper focuses on the magnum opus of the well-known Greek writer Nikos Kazantzakis (1883–1957), The Odyssey, which even in the author’s country is still astonishingly neglected due to its complexity and obscure language. First published in 1938, in more than 30,000 seventeen-syllable verses, the work describes the subsequent history of Homer’s Odysseus who after killing the suitors, bored with life in Ithaca, sets out on a quest for metaphysical transcendence. Attention is given not only to the reinterpretation of the Homeric hero who becomes the alter ego of the writer, but to a larg extent also to the successive phases of metamorphoses of the epic poem’s protagonist. As it turns out, the latter-day Odysseus, negating everything and yet not ceasing to fight, on his way goes through three stages proposed by the Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard (1813–1855): the aesthetic, the ethical, and the religious.

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Authors and Affiliations

Michał Bzinkowski
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Abstract

A history of Russian translations of Aristophanes’ comedies, with a deeper analysis of those produced by Adrian Piotrovsky (1898–1937).

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Olga Śmiechowicz
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Abstract

A review of Jerzy Danielewicz’s Antologia liryki hellenistycznej, an anthology that not only makes Hellenistic poetry accessible for Polish readers, but also supplies a critical text and, thanks to the introduction and commentaries, is an important contribution to studies of that literary period.

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Authors and Affiliations

Jan Kwapisz
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Abstract

A review of Filip Taterka’s Polish translation of the preserved fragments of Manetho’s History of Egypt.

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Marcin Janus
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Abstract

An account of the conference organised by the Ancient History Committee of the Polish Historical Society in Poznań on 20–22 September 2017.

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Authors and Affiliations

Katarzyna Balbuza

Instructions for authors

WSKAZÓWKI DLA AUTORÓW

1. W „Meandrze” zamieszczane są wyłącznie oryginalne, niepublikowane artykuły, tłumaczenia, utwory literackie, recenzje i wspomnienia. Prosimy o nadsyłanie tekstów na adres redakcji w postaci elektronicznej, jako załącznik do wiadomości e-mail. Przyjmiemy jednak materiały w każdej formie. W przypadku greki sugerujemy użycie czcionki Unicode. Redakcja nie zwraca nadsyłanych materiałów. Wszystkie prace naukowe zamieszczane w „Meandrze” podlegają recenzji zewnętrznej, wszystkie materiały są publikowane po gruntownym opracowaniu redakcyjnym. Autor otrzymuje egzemplarz autorski „Meandra” i wersję elektroniczną swojej publikacji (plik pdf). Przypominamy o konieczności podania adresu do korespondencji z autorem (sugerujemy adres e-mail).

2. Cytaty z opracowań powinny być zawarte w cudzysłowie, słowa obcojęzyczne i cytaty łacińskie wewnątrz tekstu zaznacza się kursywą, greckie nie wymagają dodatkowego wyróżnienia. Obszerniejsze cytaty (łacińskie, greckie i tłumaczenia) należy umieścić w osobnym akapicie, zapisanym mniejszą czcionką (bez cudzysłowu). Przypisy powinny znajdować się pod głównym tekstem. W głównym tekście należy unikać skrótów i cyfr. Dołączenie streszczeń po angielsku i po łacinie będzie mile widziane.

3. Adresy bibliograficzne powinny być zawarte w przypisach, w następującej formie:

Th. A. Schmitz, Moderne Literaturtheorie und antike Texte. Eine Einführung, Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, Darmstadt 2002, s. 126–154.

M. Cary, H. H. Scullard, Dzieje Rzymu. Od czasów najdawniejszych do Konstantyna, przeł. J. Schwakopf, t. II, Państwowy Instytut Wydawniczy, Warszawa 1992, s. 424–440.

K. Kumaniecki, Nad prozą antyczną, [w:] O sztuce tłumaczenia, oprac. M. Rusinek, Wrocław 1955, s. 99–109.

M. Campbell, Three Notes on Alexandrine Poetry, Hermes 102, 1974, s. 38–46.

Nazwę wydawnictwa można pominąć w przypadku książek wydanych ponad 50 lat temu.

Należy unikać skrótów „n.”, „nn.”, precyzyjnie określając przedział stron lub wersów. Jeśli ułatwi to lekturę, po „op. cit.” należy wskazać przypis: Schmitz, op. cit. (zob. wyżej, przyp. 3), s. 91–99, lub podać skrócony tytuł zamiast „op. cit.”

4. Odnośniki do autorów starożytnych powinny być podane w rozsądnie skróconej formie, w sposób ogólnie przyjęty:

Hom. Il. I 1; Pind., fr. 58 Snell-Maehler; Soph. Oed. Col. 103; Pl. Men. 70 b – 73 c; Aristot. Metaph. IV 1007 a 21–26; Cic. De or. III 93–95; Quint. Inst. VIII 6, 44.

Additional info

"MEANDER" online

Baza CEEOL (do 2016 roku, nieuaktualniana):

http://www.ceeol.com/search/journal-detail?id=1030

W Bazie Czasopism Humanistycznych i Społecznych Muzeum Historii Polski dostępne są spisy treści z lat 1946-2008:

http://www.bazhum.pl/bib/journal/290/

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Meander

Publication Ethics Policy

Publishing Ethics


“Meander” follows the guidelines of publishing ethics as laid out in the COPE Code of Conduct (https://publicationethics.org/core-practices). We accept only original articles which have not been published elsewhere; if the author is submitting a paper based on their previous work, they must diligently acknowledge this fact in the appropriate footnote. We are deeply committed to ensuring scholarly conscientiousness of the papers published in our journal and respect for the scholarly norms elaborated throughout the centuries of studies on Antiquity. We strongly encourage authors to heed carefully the guidelines for quoting or otherwise referencing the works and ideas of others; the scope both of verbatim quotes (placed in brackets) and of referencing the work of other scholars (introduced in a clear manner by statements such as “According to X…”, “As noted by Y…”) must be distinctly designated and an appropriate footnote containing a precise bibliographical entry of the work referenced must be supplied. Apart from exceptional, appropriately annotated cases, it is not allowed to use second-hand quotations; it is assumed as a general rule that the author has direct knowledge of all the works referenced in their paper. The editorial board is committed to the upkeep of ethical standards and will not allow any papers written with the use of unethical practices to be published. If such practices are detected – in particular the use of plagiarism – the article will be disqualified from being published in “Meander” and the author will be asked for an explanation.
The editorial board makes every effort to ensure that no conflict of interest arises during the review process. The reviewer is chosen from a research institution different from the author’s and the review process is double blind (the reviewer does not know the identity of the author and vice versa).

We treat seriously any allegations of misconduct or malpractice.

The editorial board is represented by the editor-in-chief, appointed by the Committee on Ancient Culture of the Polish Academy of Sciences and accountable before the Committee in accordance with the Committee’s regulations.

Peer-review Procedure

Peer Review Process

All research papers submitted to “Meander” undergo a review process as follows:

1. The editorial board approves the article for external review. If the article is not deemed to be of enough merit, the editorial board can reject it without the external review process taking place (desk rejection). Articles should be prepared according to the guidelines for authors available online or on the third page of the cover of every issue of “Meander”. Failure to comply with the guidelines may result in returning the article to the author for corrections at an earlier stage.

2. Every paper approved for review is sent to an independent reviewer who is not associated with the author’s research institution. The reviewers are experts in their respective fields, chosen according to the subject matter of the submitted article. The editorial board informs the author about submitting their article for review.

3. The review process is anonymous, the identity of both the reviewer and the author is concealed (double blind review).

4. The reviewer recommends the article for publication, correction, or rejection.

5. Basing on the review, the editorial board decides to accept the article, return it to the author for correction, or reject the article. The editorial board discloses the content of the review to the author and informs them of the outcome regarding their text, suggesting necessary corrections if need be. In some cases, especially if there arises the need for far-reaching corrections, the editorial board can have the article reviewed again, by a second reviewer, after its resubmission.

6. If the review process is taking more than three months and the author has not heard about its outcome, they should contact the editorial board. Please do not enquire about your article before that time.

7. Accepting the article for publication does not mean it will be published exactly in the form it was submitted as all papers undergo a thorough editing process (with the author’s permission).

8. Materials which are not of a strictly scholarly nature – such as reviews, obituaries, interviews, reports, literary works – are not in general submitted to external review, but they may be if the need arises.

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