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Number of results: 8
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Abstract

According to the most popular conceptualization of materialism by Richins and Dawson it consists of three components: acquisition centrality, acquisition as the pursuit of happiness and possession -defined success. They are usually combined and an overall indicator of materialism is used commonly in various studies. In the article the three components are examined separately. Differences in their nature are revealed in a theoretical analysis, whereas in two empirical studies the ways they connect with well -being are presented. The results show that the overall materialism explains much less variance of well -being than the three components taken separately. Of the three the possession-defined happiness is the most detrimental to all aspects of well -being. The possession -defined success does not connect with well -being at all. Finally, acquisition centrality elevates hedonic and psychological well -being. The conclusion is that the modest effect of materialism on well -being, usually identified in various studies, is probably at least partly due to conflicting forces existing within the construct.
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Abstract

Animals kept outside their natural environment often suffer from boredom. They don’t hunt or have a chance to conduct their mating rituals, and their natural tendency for physical activity is limited by space. These deficiencies affect their psychological well-being. But when it comes to dogs, we can help them by exploiting their excellent sense of smell.
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Abstract

The present study focused on relationships between personality traits, self-efficacy, self-esteem and basic trust, and well-being in context of entrepreneurial activity. Participants were 301 unemployed people, 157 of whom had received a grant from an employment agency to start their own business. Participants completed measures of personality traits, self-efficacy, self-esteem, basic trust, satisfaction with life, positive and negative affect. To verify if beliefs about the self and about the world mediated relationships between personality traits and well-being we conducted a multiple-sample SEM. The study results confirm that the beliefs mediate relationships between personality traits and well-being. They also show that different types of beliefs serve a different function, depending on an individual’s circumstances. Among grant acceptors, self-efficacy did not impact well-being, while self-esteem and basic trust had similar functions in both groups.
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Abstract

There is a growing body of research investigating the relationships among gratitude, self-esteem, and subjective well-being. However, there remains a scarcity of research examining the impact of self-esteem on the relationship between gratitude and subjective well-being within Arabic context. In this study, 300 Arabic speaking adults completed measurements of gratitude, self-esteem, satisfaction with life, and positive and negative experiences. Participants’ ages ranged between 18 and 54 years with a mean age of 29.67 years (SD = 8.91). The correlation results revealed that there were significant positive relationships between gratitude, self-esteem, satisfaction with life, and positive experience, while there were significant negative relationships between gratitude, self-esteem, satisfaction with life, and negative experience. The results also showed that gratitude and self-esteem directly predicted subjective well-being. Additionally, using structural equation modeling, self-esteem exerted a mediation effect on the relationship between gratitude and subjective well-being. The results suggest that enhancing self-esteem could assist adults who have gratitude to experience greater subjective well-being. Using the source of self-esteem, researchers and professionals could improve one’s subjective wellbeing by employing various gratitude activities.
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Abstract

This paper describes the results of a study that examined if psychological entitlement and hedonic well-being mediated relationships between counterproductive work behaviors (CWB) and grandiose narcissism. More specifically, the mediation effects of both types of narcissism on CWB via psychological entitlement and hedonistic subjective well-being (SWB) were examined. This study is based on self-reported, cross-sectional study on 119 working adults. Agentic and communal narcissism were positively related to CWB in parallel way, while simultaneously and indirectly decreasing CWB levels via higher SWB. Current paper is the first attempt to include agentic-communal narcissism model to explain the levels of CWB. The theoretical and practical implications of presented findings are discussed here in terms of the agency-communion model of narcissism and the “mixed blessing” effects of grandiose narcissism on subjective well-being.
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Abstract

In integrated approaches to personality (McAdams & Pals, 2006; McCrae & Costa, 1999), it is possible to examine relationships between personality traits, beliefs as characteristic adaptations, and subjective well-being. This research aimed to verify if implicit self-theories (belief about stability of human nature) proposed by Dweck (2000) and life-engagement proposed by Scheier et al. (2006) play a mediating role in relationships between personality traits and satisfaction with life. The relationships were examined with respect to infertility problem. A sample of 120 adults (aged 26–48; M = 36.60; SD = 4.82; 50% women) participated in the research. The mediation hypotheses were examined, and furthermore, four groups of couples were compared in terms of measured variables. The groups were: couples with (1) cured and (2) uncured infertility and couples who were not infertile and (3) have and (4) do not have children. Life-engagement mediated the relationship between Conscientiousness and satisfaction with life in the whole sample. The belief about stability of human nature mediated relationships between subjective well-being and Conscientiousness, Agreeableness, Neuroticism, and Extraversion only among couples with an infertility problem.
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Abstract

Participants in the study were recreational runners who completed measures of their orientation to exercise, the Five Factor Model of personality, self-efficacy as a specific adaptation (a socio-cognitive construct of personality) and measures of subjective well-being (life satisfaction) and eudaimonic well-being (life engagement). Consistent with previous research, task-oriented (internally focused) motivation to exercise was positively related to extraversion and to conscientiousness, and ego-oriented (externally focused) motivation was positively related to extraversion. Also consistent with previous research, self-efficacy and measures of well-being were positively related to extraversion and conscientiousness. Mediational analyses found that well-being mediated relationships between task-oriented motives and both extraversion and conscientiousness. Self-efficacy mediated the relationship between ego-oriented motives and extraversion. The implications of these results for the study individual differences in exercise motivation are discussed.
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Abstract

Providing informal care to adults, especially elderly people, may affect many aspects of caregivers’ life, such as: physical and mental health, financial situation, social contacts, etc. Supporting dependent seniors is associated to a higher level of stress, burden and depression as well as higher mortality. The main purpose of this paper is to analyse the relationship between caregiving for adults and the subjective quality of life among Poles aged 50–69. We took into account not only the fact of providing care to adult people, but also its beginning, continuation and ending between waves. We assumed that subjective quality of life may be expressed by two variables: one describing life satisfaction, and the second one – loneliness. We used the panel subsample from the Generation and Gender Surveys (GGS) carried out in Poland in 2010/2011 and in 2014. We found a negative effect of stopping caregiving between waves on wellbeing of women-carers, which may be related to the loss of a close person. Moreover, providing care for a longer period of time increases loneliness, which confirms that providing support to others may lead to isolation and smaller social networks.
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